Archive for

Skunk shops in suburbia: Who said cannabis was illegal?

Cannabis Leaf

The garish cannabis motif

Cannabis smoking is effectively legal. Possession of cannabis is often excuse with a limp “cannabis warning” and it is unashamedly smoked in the open. Yet the cannabis lobby continues to shout the cannabis use is persecuted. With skunk shops opening on suburban streets, James Garry cares to disagree. 

In the nondescript suburbia where I live, there is probably an Acacia Lane. Every suburbia needs an Acacia Lane to lend it a quaint Englishness. I have just checked the map and, indeed, there is a street bearing the name of the acacia. There are also Continue reading

Advertisements

The Rape of a Nation: Inadequacies in Redress for Sexual Violence in War Zones

The Congo: A woman flees marauding soldiers

The Congo: A woman flees marauding soldiers

Sexual violence and rape are commonplace in war zones. Indictments of these crimes are inadequate and convictions are few and far between. These horrific offences will continue until they are punished similar to other forms of torture. Olivia Jackson reports.    

In the past month, two separate events occurred which were a stake in the ground for the often-unmentioned victims of war zones worldwide: Firstly, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the International Criminal Court’s Chief Continue reading

Belly dancing, Doctor Who and the Roman Empire – do civil servants actually work?

Dilbert Cartoon

Typical civil servants, huh?

In a release of information the Department for Transport has disclosed a list of the 1000 most visited sites by its civil servants. Belly dancing, Doctor Who and Roman Empire websites were among the most popular but in a time of spending cuts is it right for these civil servants to be wasting time and money? William Sharman asks.

In a country where both public and private sector spending is being heavily cut in order to repair the mistakes of the previous Labour Government you would imagine that everyone is working hard and Continue reading

American Politics: How to end the impasse

Founding Fathers

The Founding Fathers

Congress is in deadlock about raising the American debt ceiling. From the Founding Fathers to Bill Clinton via Barry Goldwater, Luke Cahill examines the history of American politics and diagnoses the current impasse.  

As Speaker Boehner, puts his debt plan to the House, the lower chamber, the Democrat controlled Senate, has already decided that they will not allow it to pass. As Congress struggles to agree on how much to cut before they raise the debt ceiling, fatal weaknesses are yet again open for all to see. Continue reading

Just the two of us? Polygamy in the UK

Say no to polygamy

Polygamy is harmful to women as well as society

It is a little known fact that, while technically illegal in Britain, bigamous and polygamous marriages exist. State benefits make provisions for those in bigamous and polygamous marriages. If we continue to make concessions to other cultures’ illegal marital practices, there will be unintended consequences for our society that even liberals and cultural relatives will not enjoy. Olivia Jackson investigates. Continue reading

NHS Cuts – are the Tories really to blame?

nhs cuts

Who's to blame for the cuts?

Before the last General Election, David Cameron invested a great deal of effort to explain his love of the NHS and pledged not to cut its budget. After a year in power the Conservatives are being criticised for curbing NHS spending. However, it is the Coalition that should take the blame, not the Tories, writes Nicola Bradshaw. Continue reading

The end of integration – Europe in retreat

European Flags

A crowded Europe

The latest Euro crisis has cast doubt on the viability of European integration. While the economics of the EU are easy to implement, its desire for political dominion over its 27 members is damaging the Union. The European Union must learn that its citizens want is a single market and nothing more, writes Huw Longton. 

History shows us that Europeans feel more European at times of crisis and uncertainty. Indeed, it is in such a context that Europe has integrated most: the aftermath of World War II, the collapse of Continue reading

Military cuts are going too far – We couldn’t take another military conflict

Military Cuts

Military cuts have gone too far

Is the news today that the Army will receive cuts of another 7,000 men above the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) a sign that things are going too far? With criticism and warnings coming from across the military hierarchy, will Mr Cameron and his government realise their mistakes, asks J. Britain?

When the SDSR was originally announced, it came under intense criticism. The loss of Britain’s only operational aircraft carrier, the entire Harrier fleet gone and cuts to vehicle numbers in all three forces are just a few of the major changes made to the armed forces. It is not all bad, as the Territorial Army (reservists) will be receiving more money. Also, Continue reading

A Very British Problem: The High-Speed London to Birmingham Line

Chinese High Speed Train

Rail networks: The Chinese are way ahead of us

The proposed high-speed rail link between London and Birmingham will take at least another decade to complete. China has managed to connect Shanghai and Beijing within 36 months. It is not just rail networks, but entire infrastructures are taking the British ages to complete. Red tape is primarily to blame, writes Christopher Wheeler.

On the 27th of July 2011, 25 years after it was originally proposed and 4 years after initial building work began the Hindhead Tunnel in Surrey was finally opened.  At the same time, debate in Britain Continue reading

The Libyan Stalemate: Why Libya needs a Gaddafi

Colonel Gaddafi

Colonel Gaddafi

The war against Libya is all wrong. Britain has the wrong military equipment and no understand of Libyan society. If we must get rid of Colonel Gaddafi, he must be replaced with another member of the Gaddafa tribe, namely Saif al-Islam Gaddafi. Harry Raffal reports.

The recent revelations from the foreign office that Britain would be willing to countenance an outcome in Libya which did not require Colonel Gaddafi’s exile has inevitably raised questions as to how Britain became mired in Libya.

The first mistake seems to have been to adopt the hard-line towards Gaddafi’s regime which has been missing, or was originally missing, in Continue reading

Read all about…

Sites We Like

Directories We’re Listed In

British Blogs Politics Blogs
Politics Blog Directory
Add blog to our directory. http://www.wikio.co.uk My Zimbio
KudoSurf Me!