Islam

This category contains 10 posts

“Heartland” review by Wes Brown

Heartland

Heartland, Cartwright

For those of us hungry for something substantive in our contemporary fiction, Heartland, Anthony Cartwright’s second novel, elegantly crafts a deft lyrical realism that’s given shape by a tightly woven, elliptical narrative argues Wes Brown.

Like Don DeLillo’s classic Underworld – Cartwright, cubist-like, uses sport to draw together disparate strands of fragmentation:

“Beckham’s face filled the screen, filled the room. Rob had driven past the giant hoarding over the motorway a few weeks ago. He’d driven for miles, worrying about the game against the mosque and the election, worrying about his dad Continue reading

The Philistine, the Fundamentalists and the Feminist

Kelly Brook

Kelly Brook: An unlikely cause of religious debate

Kelly Brook’s “Lynx” adverts have prompted an unlikely debate after two Muslim youths were prosecuted for vandalising one such Lynx advert featuring Brook. Leaping into the debate are the cultural Philistines, fundamentalist Muslims and feminists: But it is the conservative response which is needed, writes Charles Brickdale.

Every now and then an event takes place on the fringes of the news which casts a helpful light on larger issues.

To reverse the message of Pieter Brueghel’s painting of Icarus’ death, Continue reading

Why Britain is selective about The Arab Spring Revolutions

Arab Spring

Arab Spring Revolution

The situation in Syria grows worse as the government massacres its own people during Ramadan. Why is Britain not intervening in Syria’s Arab Spring Revolution when she keenly humiliates herself in Libya? James Garry reports.

I oppose all wars that are not in the national interest and condemn them as a waste of life. The wars that Britain has fought in the last fifteen years – Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya –  leave me perplexed. They are all liberal-interventionist wars. Wars waged by a nation Continue reading

Just the two of us? Polygamy in the UK

Say no to polygamy

Polygamy is harmful to women as well as society

It is a little known fact that, while technically illegal in Britain, bigamous and polygamous marriages exist. State benefits make provisions for those in bigamous and polygamous marriages. If we continue to make concessions to other cultures’ illegal marital practices, there will be unintended consequences for our society that even liberals and cultural relatives will not enjoy. Olivia Jackson investigates. Continue reading

We must not let the Left and Islamists exploit the horror in Norway

Anders Breivik

The tragedy wrought by this man is being exploited

The tragedy in Norway which threatens to besmirch the conservative cause. The tragedy must not be used by the Left and its Islamist allies to silence conservative and Christian dissent about multiculturalism and Islamisation, writes Charles Brickdale. 

Among elements of the left and of the self-appointed Muslim leadership throughout Europe and the US a clear trend is emerging in response to Anders Breivik’s massacre of the innocents in Norway. Continue reading

Famine and the future of Somalia

famine in Somalia

Famine declared in Somalia

The prospects for those affected by famine in the Horn of Africa are bleak. Britain is leading the way with foreign aid; other countries and their relief agencies are sitting on their hands. We must ensure the aid gets to those who need it, writes Harry Raffal.

The humanitarian crisis is worsening in the Horn of Africa after the worst drought in Africa in half a century. On the 20th of July the UN officially declared famine in two southern Somalia regions stating that “Given the combination of severity and geographic scope this Continue reading

Why the Palestinians didn’t join the Arab Spring and revolt against Israel

Not participating in the Arab Spring...

Why did not the Palestinians follow the lead of their Arab neighbours and rise up against the regime they consider to be oppressive? Maybe it is because they are too busy fighting themselves. And that Israel’s freer than anywhere in the Middle East, writes Alex Patnick.

The Arab Spring started earlier this year in Tunisia and spread across the Arab world, like wildfire. Yet it has seemed to skip Israel’s Arabs and the Palestinians – why is this?  It has affected its neighbours, its border with Syria but apart from the regular disturbances that in the West Bank and rocket attacks from Gaza, Israeli-Arabs and Palestinians have remained muted, and even more united in trying to get a peaceful solution to the ongoing conflict. Continue reading

South Sudan – The revelry and perils for a new nation

Sudanese refugees

On the ninth of July, the former Republic of Sudan split to form Sudan and the new Republic of South Sudan. It is inevitable that some people will disregard this ‘unimportant nation’ as no news of any concern at all but I think that is pitifully naïve, and here is why. First, before it split, it was the largest country in Africa, with a potentially huge emerging market for businesses and entrepreneurs who were willing to go into the warzone. Secondly, since the current president of Sudan (the old president of the two combined countries) is wanted for crimes against humanity and genocide against the South Sudanese.

This split is, if nothing else, a triumph of diplomacy to avoid such mass scale killings. Thirdly, the combined international importance of the oil wealth in South Sudan alongside being blacklisted by USA as a sponsor of Continue reading

Time to Wake Up and Smell the Lapsang Souchong: Why We Should Do BIG Business with the Communist Party of China

Britain can't dictate to the Chinese any more

Long gone are the days when The West could dictate terms to China. The balance of power has changed. Britain cannot afford to be too fussy about human-rights; we must do urgent business with the Chinese, writes Christian Walker.

We live in especially interesting times, internationally. This is because we are witnessing the rise of a new global power in the form of China; a rise which could culminate in the eclipse of American power (initially economically, later militarily) at some undetermined point in the future – all things being equal, certainly during the lifetime of our children. ‘What about India’, you say. Good point. A key reason for the focus on China owes to the unique challenges China’s rise poses to the global community – challenges of a very serious and fundamental nature, which are (thankfully) absent when considering India’s rise. Continue reading

M.F. Husain: The tragedy of a growing trend.

In early June M.F. Husain died as an exile in London at 95 years of age, but during his life he was a brilliant artist of expressionism. Known to many as “The Picasso of India”, Husain began his career painting billboards and posters for Bollywood films in the 1940s. Over the decades, the scope of his ambitions extended beyond the canvas, becoming involved in photography and film. Directing “Gaja Gamini” in 2000, age was no obstacle for this man and the multiple uses of his talents are a testament to the dedication and passion he had for India.

But in one of those ironies in which our recent times are replete, Husain would eventually see his work condemned, decades after their unveiling, and his life threatened. Facing increasing legal pressure, there eventually would  be little option but to leave the country he dedicated his life to. Continue reading

Read all about…

Sites We Like

Directories We’re Listed In

British Blogs Politics Blogs
Politics Blog Directory
Add blog to our directory. http://www.wikio.co.uk My Zimbio
KudoSurf Me!