Liberal Democrats

This category contains 11 posts

Harry’s five of the week: Market analysis, Syria, mansion tax, Kurdish terrorism, NHS

mansion tax

The mansion tax has raised its head again

With the riots consuming most of the newsprint and dominating the airwaves, you may not be aware that Bolton are sitting pretty at the top of the Premier League. Harry Raffal brings you the other storylines that may have slipped your notice. 

With the riots in Britain and the subsequent political fallout occupying central stage this week and only broken to bring us the first week of the Premier League and England thrashing India to go 3-0 up in the series, Continue reading

Harry’s five of the week: Al-Shabaab, defence, Lib Dems, wind farms, MRSA

al Shabaab

al Shabaab

With the American debt crisis dominating most of the front page headlines at the beginning of the week followed by a dramatic slide in major stock markets you may have been fortunate enough to avoid stories involving Newcastle’s Joey Barton quoting Nietzsche and a Polar bear killing a school boy on an expedition in Norway but amongst this detritus, Harry Raffal reports five of issues which have been left knocking around. Continue reading

One penny to join the Labour Party: How it went wrong for New Labour

1p

The value of Labour Party membership

Labour’s inducement to military veterans to join for a measly penny is the epitome of Labour’s loss of identity and desperation for popularity by any means. Chris Smith argues that the Labour Party can only be saved by an honest figure such as Tony Benn who has clearly defined beliefs and principles; someone who knows that the Party should stand for the working-classes.

The Labour Party has announced it will be offering party membership to military veterans for just 1p. The move is intended to capitalise on growing disillusionment with the Tories among the Continue reading

NHS Cuts – are the Tories really to blame?

nhs cuts

Who's to blame for the cuts?

Before the last General Election, David Cameron invested a great deal of effort to explain his love of the NHS and pledged not to cut its budget. After a year in power the Conservatives are being criticised for curbing NHS spending. However, it is the Coalition that should take the blame, not the Tories, writes Nicola Bradshaw. Continue reading

What purpose do scandals serve in Britain?

Scandal

Why do we love a good scandal?

One thing you can guarantee about life in Britain is that there will be a good scandal soon. Chris Smith explores the peculiarly British need for a scandal. 

Observing the current scandal engulfing News International expand day by day, along with debate in the media about whether life as we now it will ever be the same again, the thought occurs: Why in Britain have we seen scandals affecting numerous different sections of society? What does this tell us about modern Britain as a whole?

The first large scandal I can remember is the Iraq war; the dodgy dossier, the death of Dr David Kelly and the Continue reading

The Tories are ruthless: Is it inevitable they’ll scalp Cameron?

David Cameron

Don't be nice, Dave. They're ruthless

History is replete with examples of the Conservative Party orchestrating the demise of its leader. Cameron will survive the phone-hacking scandal. But they are bound to get him for something, writes Colin Marsden.

The phone hacking scandal that has engulfed the Prime Minister will not likely lead to his resignation, he is safe for now, but the Tory party is ruthless when it comes to removing leaders that no longer look like they are winners. Continue reading

Lessons that David Cameron must learn from ‘Hackgate’

Baroness Warsi

Warsi: Make her High Commissioner to Pakistan

‘Hackgate’ is David Cameron’s first real crisis of government. The absence of Tories coming out and defending Cameron is suggestive about the Prime Minister’s popularity within his own party. If he’s going to successfully deal with the next disaster to come his way, he needs to schmooze with his backbenchers. And get rid of Baroness Warsi, writes A.P. Schrader.

Like many, I have been totally absorbed by ‘Hackgate’, though frankly one does rather begin to tire of the whole tedious imbroglio Continue reading

George Osborne or David Davis should stab David Cameron in the back

Quick! Now! Stab him!

David Cameron is not the best leader for the Conservative Party or for the country. His friendships with Andy Coulson and Mrs Grant Mitchell are reason enough for us to get rid of him. But he’ll survive the scandal no doubt. This is why we need either of two proper Tories, George Osborne and David Davis, to whet the blade and aim for Cameron’s spleen, writes Ventilator Blues.

When in times of national emergency it is vital that a proper sense of perspective is developed and that national interest is put first. Continue reading

If I were appointed Health Secretary tomorrow…

competition makes us smile

Politics On Toast’s very own A.P. Schrader has been appointed health secretary by Her Majesty’s Government  (yes, really). In his first act he abolishes the Department of Health. Next he razes and rebuilds the National Health Service – one that will compete for our business.  

What would I do if David Cameron appointed me Health Secretary tomorrow? I dare say Andrew Lansley still asks himself that question every night before he goes to bed. Or does he? Jacqueline Davis of The Guardian would have us believe that the Coalition’s apparently Lib Dem-led U-turn “was a fake” and that the Lansley reforms “remain on track”. We can only hope. Even if they are, however, I have serious doubts as to whether the Lansley proposals go anything like far enough, even in their un-watered Continue reading

The Myth of the Progressive Majority: Why we vote Right not Left

It is often said that in Britain there is a ‘Progressive Majority’ and that if the splitting of votes between left-wing parties did not occur the Conservatives would never win another election. This is an argument though based on lazy generalisations, false assumptions and a plain distortion of facts which, if fully examined, show that the ‘Progressive Majority’ in Britain is a myth.

If we accept the concept held in left-wing circles of the idea of a ‘Progressive Majority’ we can say that it is flawed for any number of reasons. Firstly, it is based on an incorrect view of British political history. For the idea of a ‘Progressive Majority’ to work there must have been points in history where the Conservatives were not in power and the ‘Progressive Majority’ made a visible impact. Continue reading

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